C.V.
Leonard Hayflick, Ph.D.
Professor of Anatomy (Adj.)
University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
36991 Greencroft Close
P. O. Box 89
The Sea Ranch, California 95497

CURRICULUM VITAE
December, 2003

Personal

Date and Place of Birth May 20, 1928, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Citizenship U.S.A.
Marital Status Married, 5 children

Address University of California, San Francisco
School of Medicine
Department of Anatomy
36991 Greencroft Close
P.O. Box 89
The Sea Ranch, California 95497

Telephone (707) 785-3181
FAX (707) 785-3809
Internet len@gene.com

Education
John Bartram High School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1946
University of Pennsylvania, Phila, PA B.A. Microbiology and Chemistry, 1951
University of Pennsylvania, Phila, PA M.S. Medical Microbiology, 1953
University of Pennsylvania, Phila, PA Ph.D. Medical Microbiology and Chemistry, 1956

Military Service
U.S. Army, Ordnance Department, Staff Sergeant, 1946-1948

Fellowships and Scholarships
Winner of competitive scholarship to Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania upon completion of high school, February, 1946. Scholarship declined in order to attend University of Pennsylvania, Department of Microbiology. University of Pennsylvania Scholarship, September 1953 - June 1954.

University of Pennsylvania Scholarship, September 1954 - June 1955.

George Leib Harrison Fellowship in Medical Microbiology, September 1955 - June 1956. University of
Pennsylvania.

James W. McLaughlin Research Fellowship in Infection and Immunity, Post-doctoral, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, August 1956 - March 1958.

Career Development Awardee, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 1962-1970.

Present Positions
Professor of Anatomy (Adj.) Research Cell Biologist
University of California, San Francisco Dept. of Veteran's Affairs, DVA Medical Center,151E School of Medicine and Cell Biology and Aging Section
Department of Anatomy 4150 Clement St.
Parnassus Street San Francisco California , 94121 San Francisco, CA 94143-0452

Previous Positions Held
1. Director, Center for Gerontological Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, 3357 Turlington Hall, Gainesville, Florida 32611 1981-1986

2. Professor of Zoology, Department of Zoology, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 1981-1986

3. Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 1981-1986

4. Senior Research Cell Biologist, Bruce Lyon Memorial Research Laboratory, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Oakland, California, 1976-81.

5. Professor of Medical Microbiology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, 1968-76.

6. Assistant Professor of Research Medicine, Department of Research Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 1966-68.

7. Associate Member, The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, 36th and Spruce Streets, Philadelphia, PA, 1958-68.

8. James W. McLaughlin Research Fellow in Infection and Immunity, Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. August, 1956 - April, 1958.

9. Research Assistant in Bacteriology, Sharp and Dohme, Division of Merck and Company, Inc., June 1951 - June 1952.

Present Activities
1. Non-Resident Fellow, Institute for Higher Studies, Santa Barbara, California, 1973 - Present.

2. Member, Editorial Board, "Executive Health Report", 1970 - Present.

3. Member, Editorial Board, "Mechanisms of Ageing and Development", 1972 -1998.

4. Member, Editorial Board, "Gerontology and Geriatrics Education", 1980 - Present.

5. Member of Board of Directors and Research Advisory Committee (Study Section), American Federation for Aging Research, New York, N.Y., 1981 – 2002.

6. Editor-in-Chief, "Experimental Gerontology", 1984 – 1998.

7. Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Foundation on Gerontology,
Bradenton, Florida, 1985 - Present.

8. Appointed by Dean as Visiting Professor in the School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology Kurume University, Kurume, Japan, 1992 - Present.

9. Member, Editorial Advisory Board, Protocols in Cell and Tissue Culture, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. Chichester, United Kingdom 1989 - Present.

10. Member, Medical Advisory Board, Women’s Health Digest, 1995 -Present

11. Member, Editorial Board, Veggie Life, 1995 –1999.

12. Member, Scientific Advisory Council, Society for the Inhibition of Age Related Processes, Holon, Israel, 1995 - Present

13. Scientific Advisory Board Member, Society for In Vitro Biology, 1998-Present

14. Consultant, Genentech, Inc. 1982 - Present

15. Member, Scientific Advisory Board and Consultant, Geron Corp. 1991 - 2000.

16. Chairman, Awards Committee, Gerontological Society of America 1998 – 2001

17. Scientific Advisory Board Member, Origen Therapeutics, Inc. 1998- Present

18. Scientific Advisory Board Member, Advanced Cell technology, 1999-Present

Previous Activities
1. California State Representative to White House Conference on Aging, 1972.

2. National Cancer Planning Committee, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 1972.

3. Chairman, California State Committee on Health for the White House Conference on Aging, 1971-1972.

4. Member, Advisory Council, Association for the Advancement of Aging Research, 1970-1971.

5. Member of Solid Tumor Virus Study Section and consultant to Special Virus Cancer Program, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 1963-1972.

6. Member, Program Committee, Tissue Culture Association, 1970.

7. Member, Board of Trustees, Tissue Culture Association, 1966-1968.

8. President, California Chapter, Tissue Culture Association, 1971-1973.

9. Senator-at-Large, Basic Medical Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1970-1973.

10. Chairman, Adult Development and Aging Research and Training Committee, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, 1972-1973.

11. Member, Council, Tissue Culture Association, 1972-1974.

12. Consultant, Office of the Director National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 1963-1974.

13. Vice-President and Council Member, Gerontological Society of America, 1972-1973.

14. Member, Cell and Developmental Biology Film Program Steering Committee, M.I.T., 1970-1973.

15. Member, Council, Western Gerontological Society, 1972-1974, 1981-1983.

16. Chairman, General Research Support Grant Committee, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1972-1974.

17. Chairman and Executive Committee Member, Biological Sciences Section, Gerontological Society, 1972-1974.

18. Founding Member, National Advisory Council on Aging, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 1975 and Chairman of Executive Committee.

19. Member, American Executive Committee of the International Association of Gerontology, 1972-1975.

20. Member, Argonne Universities Association Review Committee for the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 1973-1976.

21. Vice President, Tissue Culture Association, 1974-1976.

22. Member, Program Committee and Awards Committee, Gerontological Society of America, 1972-1977.

23. Member, Virology and Cell Biology Study Section, American Cancer Society, 1974-1976.

24. Member, Subcommittee on the Mycoplasmataceae of the International Committee on Bacteriological Nomenclature, 1965-1978.

25. Member, Advisory Committee, Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 1965-1978.

26. Program Committee, Western Gerontological Society, 1977-1979.

27. Member, Committee on International Relations, Gerontological
Society of America, 1980-1982.

28. Member, Public Policy Committee, Gerontological Society of America, 1980-1982.

29. Observer, White House Conference on Aging, 1981, Representing Gerontological Society of America and State of California.

30. Member, Board of Director, Western Gerontological Society, 1981- 1983.

31. Offered First Directorship of National Institute on Aging, NIH, Bethesda, MD, April 1975. Offer declined.

32. President, Gerontological Society of America, 1982-1983.

33. Director, Center for Gerontological Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, 1981-1985.

34. Member, Advisory Board, International Exchange Center for Gerontology, State of Florida University System, University of South Florida, Tampa, 1982-1986.

35. Secretary, Cell Culture Committee, International Association of Biological Standardization, 1963-1973.

36. Member, Research Advisory Committee, Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America - College Retirement Equities Funds, New York, N.Y., 1974 - 1980.

37. Elected Councillor, Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 1984-1988.

38. Member of Sandoz Jury for Sandoz Prize in Gerontology and Geriatrics, 1985 - 1989.

39. Member of Council of the International Association of Biological Standardization, 1987 - 1989.

40. Treasurer and Member of Executive Committee, International Association of Gerontology, 1985 - 1989.

41. Member, Board of Directors, The Center for Climacteric Studies, Inc., Gainesville, FL, 1985 - 1988.

42. Treasurer and Member of Executive Committee, International Association of Gerontology, 1985 - 1989.

43. Senior Editor, Biological Sciences, The Microfiche Collection of Information on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1984 - 1990.

44. Gerontological Society of America, Committee Member for Glenn Foundation Award in Basic Biological Research in Aging, 1990.

45. Referee, Macy Faculty Scholar award Program, Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, 1977 - 1987.

46. Gerontological Society of America, Committee Member for Development and Fund Raising, 1990 - 1991.

47. Chairman, Cell Culture Committee of the International Association of Microbiological Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 1985 - 1993.

48. Member, Editorial Board, "Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine" 1987 - 1994.

49. Member, Advisory Committee, Center for Aging Research, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 1981 - 1990.

50. Member, Scientific Advisory Board, American Longevity Association, Inc., University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 1981 - 1990.

51. Vice President, Member of Board of Directors and Executive Committee, Chairman of the Research Advisory Committee (Study Section), American Federation for Aging Research, New York, N.Y.,
1981 - 1995.

52. Member, Board of Directors and Editorial Board, Bollettino Dell "Instituto Sieroterapico Milanese, Archivo de Microbiologia de Immunologia," Milan, Italy, 1968 - 1987.

53. California Foundation for Medical Research, Member, 1979 - 1985.

54. Member, Editorial Board, "A Revista Portuguesa de Medicina Geriatrica", 1987 - Present.

55. Member, Advisory Board, Lousiana Gerontology Education Center, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA, 1989 - 1994.

56. Gerontological Society of America, Chairman, Working Group to Establish Executive Director Job Description and Search Committee for Executive Director, 1991-1992.

57. Chairman, Search Committee, For Executive Director of the Gerontological Society of America, 1991-92.

58. Visiting Professor at Oita Medical University, Oita, Japan, 1993 - 1995.

Scientific Journal Affiliations
1. Editor-in-Chief, "Experimental Gerontology", Published by Elsevier Press, N.Y., 1984 - 1998.

2. Member, Editorial Board, "Mechanisms of Ageing and Development", 1972 – 1999.

3. Foreign Reviewing Editor, "Tissue Culture Research Communications" (Journal of the Japanese Tissue Culture Association) 1991 - Present.

4. Member, Editorial Board, "Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine," 1988 - 1992.

5. Member, Board of Directors and Editorial Board, "Bollettino Dell Instituto Sieroterapico Milanese, Archivo de Microbiologia ed Immunologia'", Milan, Italy, 1968 - 1988.

6. Member, Editorial Board, "Executive Health Report", 1970 -Present.

7. Member, Editorial Board, "A Revista Portuguesa de Medicina Geriatrica", 1987 - 1991.

8. Member, Editorial Board, "Journal of Bacteriology", 1964-1972.

9. Member, Editorial Board, "Journal of Virology", 1967-1970.

10. Member, Editorial Board, "Infection and Immunity" 1968-1978.

11. Assistant Editor, "In Vitro", Journal of the Tissue Culture Association, 1969-1975.

12. Associate Editor, "Cancer Research", 1972-1980.

13. Editor, Biological Sciences Section, "Journal of Gerontology", 1975-1980.

14. Member, Editorial Advisory Board, "Protocols in Cell and Tissue Culture," John Wiley and Sons, West Sussex, England, 1989 - Present.

15. Member, Editorial Board, Cell Structure and Function (Journal of the Japan Society for Cell Biology)
1994-Present.

16. Member, Advisory Board, Geriatrics and Gerontology International, Tokyo, Japan, Blackwell Publishing Co.
2001- Present

17. Honorary Editor, Experimental Gerontology, 2000 to Present

Teaching Responsibilities
1. Professor of Anatomy, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. 1988 - Present.

2. Professor of Zoology and of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Gerontological Studies, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and School of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 1981 - 1986.

3. Professor of Medical Microbiology, Stanford, University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, July, 1968 - February, 1976.

4. Sponsor and Instructor of National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Summer Courses on the Biology of Aging, 1970; Instructor, 1969 - 1973.

5. Assistant Professor, Department of Research Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 1966-1968.

6. Organizer and Instructor in Course in Principles and Applications of Cell Culture, Department of Medical Microbiology, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies, 1965.

7. Assistant Director of the Tissue Culture Association Summer Course, University of Wisconsin, 1962-1963.

8. Organizer and Instructor in Tissue Culture Course in Graduate School, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1962-1967.

9. Associate in Tissue Culture Association Summer Course, Madison, Wisconsin, 1961, on "Principles and Application of Tissue Culture."

10. Organizer and Associate in Medical Microbiology in course "Principles and Application of Tissue Culture" in Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Medical Microbiology, 1959-1960.

11. Assistant Instructor in Medical Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania, June 1955 - June 1956.

12. Visiting Professor, Kurume University Medical School, 1991- Present.

13. Visiting Professor, Oita Medical University, Oita, Japan 1991-1995.

14. National Science Foundation Chautauqua Course Organizer and Lecturer, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002. “How and Why We Age,” Temple University, Philadelphia, PA

Honors and Awards
1. Career Development Awardee of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 1962-1970.

2. Fellow, Gerontological Society, 1969 - Present.

3. Fifth Pomerat Memorial Lecturer on Cultured Human Cells and the Biology of Senescence, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, February, 1970.

4. Fourteenth Annual Ciba Foundation Lecturer on Research in Aging, Leeds, England, April, 1970.

5. Commission for Aging Research Lecturer on Cell Aging and Cell Differentiation. The Academy of Sciences and Literature, Mainz, Germany, November, 1971.

6. Huddleson Memorial Lectureship in Microbiology, Michigan State University, 1967.

7. Recipient of annual Robert Kleemeier Award, Gerontological Society of America, 1972, for basic research in the biology of aging.

8. University of Southern California, Gerontology Center, Biomedical Sciences and Aging Award, 1974.

9. University of Southern California, Gerontology Center, Kesten Lecture Award, 1974, "for pioneering findings in microbiology that will open the door for more research avenues on the problem of aging."

10. The Albert H. Rowe, Sr., M.D. Lecture, Samuel Merritt Hospital, Thirtieth Annual Medical Seminar, Oakland, California, 1975.

11. Non-Resident Fellow, Institute for Higher Studies, Santa Barbara, CA

12. Visiting Scientist, Weizmann Institute of Science, Center for Aging, Rehovoth, Israel, July 1975 and September 1980.

13. Keynote speaker, Centennial Celebration of the Founding of the Free University of Amsterdam and Thirtieth Anniversary of the Founding of the School of Medicine, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September, 1980.

14. Masters Lecturer, American Psychological Association, Annual Convention, Toronto, Canada, August, 1978.

15. Recipient of $20,000 Brookdale Award for Biological and Clinical Research from the Gerontological Society of America, November 1980, "for nationally and internationally recognized scholarly and scientific contributions to biological and clinical research in gerontology."

16. American Federation for Aging Research, Leadership award, New York City, May 1983, "In recognition of his pioneering research in the fields of geriatrics and gerontology and, in particular, his seminal studies on the life cycles of cell growth and reproduction. His work has profoundly influenced the direction of present and future investigations into the biomedical mechanisms of the aging process."

17. Elected President, Gerontological Society of America, 1982-1983.

18. Academy of Science and Literature, Mainz, Germany, and Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Thirtieth Karl August Forster Honorary Lectureship in Programmed Biosynthesis, Mainz, Germany, May, 1983.

19. The 1984 Hoffman - LaRoche Lectureship in Microbiology, Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers Univ., Rutgers, N.J., April, 1984.

20. The 1984 Wadsworth Memorial Fund Lecturer, Rush Medical College, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, April, 1984.

21. The 1984 Presidential Citation Award of the International Organization for Mycoplasmology for "Discovery and Identification of the Etiological Agent of Human Primary Atypical Pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae", Jerusalem, Israel, June, 1984.

22. The 1984 Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Research Recognition Award, Ardmore, Oklahoma, October, 1984. Prize of $5000 and Silver Bowl for "discovery of the limited proliferative capacity of cultured normal human cells, establishment of the field of cytogerontology, establishment of the WI-38 cell strain used
world-wide for human virus vaccine products, and for discovery and identification of the etiological agent of human primary atypical pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae."

23. Listed in "Who's Who in America" and "International Who's Who in Medicine", "American Men and Women of Science", etc.

24. Elected Councilor of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 1984-1988.

25. The Tenth Stuart Mudd Memorial Lecture Award, Sponsored by the Eastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Society of Microbiology, 29 April 1985, for "discovery of Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the etiologic agent of primary atypical pneumonia, development of the first human diploid cell strain, and the
"Hayflick Limit" that occurs in the limited ability of cultured normal human and animal cells to divide."

26. Invited speaker, 1986 and 1992 Sandoz Lectures in Gerontology, Basel, Switzerland, February, 1986 and February 1992.

27. June 1986, Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science "for fundamental studies on the finite lifetime of cultured normal human cells interpreted as cell aging and for discovery of a new mycoplasma causing human pneumonia."

28. One of the 1000 most cited contemporary scientists in the world in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, enzymology, genetics and molecular biology, Institute for Scientific Information, Current Contents, #41, October 12, 1981, page 5.

29. Author of 4 of the 100 most cited scientific papers of the 2 million papers published in the basic biomedical sciences from 1961 to 1978, Institute for Scientific Information, Current Contents, #5, February 4, 1980, page 5.

30. Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations and Human Relations, Honorary Lecturer, Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa, April, 1989.

31. Elected to Honorary Membership in the Tissue Culture Association by the Council, Executive Board and Membership, April, 1989. “Honorary Membership is the highest award that the Association can confer upon a person in recognition of their outstanding contributions to the field of cell and tissue culture. Only 23 individuals have been so honored." (From notice of award.)

32. Chairman and Speaker, Italian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Regional Congress on "Longevity," Universita "La Sapienza," Rome, Italy, October 1990

33. Invited Speaker on "Cellular Aging" at Istituto Scientifico Roussel, Italia, Colloquium on Aging, Rome, Italy, Villa Cedro, October 1990.

34. Co-winner (with Prof. Hans Thomae, Bonn, Germany) of the 1991 International Association of Gerontology Sandoz Prize in Gerontology. (50,000 Swiss Franks)

35. Bernard M. Bloomfield Memorial Lecturer on the occasion of the dedication of the Bloomfield Centre for Research on Aging, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, The Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, October 2, 1991. Medal Awarded.

36. Lectura Magistralis, "The Cell Biology of Human Aging," 20th National Congress, Italian Society of Pathology, Modena, Italy,October 1990.

37. Visiting Professor (Professore Contratto) University of Parma, Faculty of Medicine amd Surgery, Parma, Italy, October, 1991.

38. Elected Honorary Member, Society of Medicine and Natural Science of the University of Parma, Parma, Italy, October 1991. Medal Awarded.

39. Honorary Lecture, "Biology of Aging," Ateneo di Brescia Accademia di Scienze Lettere ed Arti and the Centro di Studio e Ricerca Sulla Terza Eta', Universita degli Studi di Brescia, Italy, October 1991.

40. Honorary Lecture, "Cell Biology of Aging," University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, October 1991.

41. Recipient of Presidential Award Silver Medal from the International Association of Gerontology (IAG) for "distinguished contributions as Treasurer of the IAG, 1985-1989."

42. Visiting Professor, Kurume University Medical School, 1991-Present

43. Visiting Professor, Oita Medical University, Oita, Japan 1991-1995.

44. Eighth Annual Walter A. Rohlfing Medical Lectureship, March 18, 1995, University of California, Fresno, Medical Education Program

45. Benjamin Leiberman Memorial Lecture, October 16, 1995, University of California, San Francisco-Mount Zion Center on Aging.

46. Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society for In Vitro Biology for “your exemplary record of achievement and contribution in the pioneering work on how mammalian cells age, which has been instrumental in gerontology and medical science.” Awarded at the World Conference on Cell Culture, San Francisco, CA, June, 1996.

47. Elected Academician by the Ukrainian Acadamy of Medical Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine, November, 1995.

48. Annual “Hayflick Lectureship” established by the American Aging Association, 1996.

49. Recipient of the “Herbert De Vries Research Award” of the Council on Aging and Adult Development of the American Alliance for Health and Physical Education “In recognition of outstanding research and writing that has contributed to the Council on Aging and Adult Development and to the Profession.” Presented at Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO, March 1997.

50. Sigma Xi, Honorary Scientific Society, Endowed Lecturship, University of Southern Illinois, Carbondale, Illinois, October 16, 1997.

51. Elected corresponding member of the Société de Biologie of France, 1998. The Society, was founded in 1864 with headquarters at the Collége de France, Paris.

52. Keynote Speaker, Conference on Cellular Senescence, Oxford University, Oriel College, Oxford, England, July, 1998.

53. Keynote Speaker, Tenth Biennial Conference of the Hawaii-Pacific Gerontological Society, Honolulu, Hawaii, September, 1998.

54. Keynote Speaker, International Conference on Telomeres and Telomerase, Marianne Leibert, Inc., Redwood City, CA, June,1998.

55. Keynote Speaker, Fourth International Conference on Neurobiology and Neuroendocrinology of Aging, Bregenz, Austria, July, 1998.

56. Dr. Toon van Wezel Award and Honorary Lecture, for “Contributions made over several decades to the science and practical application of mammalian cell cultures.” Awarded by The European Society for Animal Cell Technology (ESACT), Lugano, Switzerland, 25-29 April 1999.

57. Lord Cohen of Birkenhead Medal presented by the British Society for Research on Aging for major contributions to Gerontology, London, June, 1999.

58. Keynote Lecture, FDA Conference on Evolving Scientific and Regulatory Perspectives on Cell Substrates for Vaccine Development, Rockville, MD, September 7, 1999.

59. Boureston Lecturer, Keynote Address, Minnesota Gerontological Society Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, April 28, 2000.

60. Keynote Speaker, California Society of Plastic Surgeons, Santa Monica, CA, May 26, 2000.

61. Annual Hayflick Lecture in Aging established at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and presentation of commemorative plaque, October 2000.

62. Publication of “Hayflick, his limit, and cellular ageing” by J. Shay and W. Wright, a Timeline, in Nature Reviews, Molecular Cell Biology, October 1, 2000, pages 72-76.

63. Recipient of the year 2001, $10,000 Life Extension Prize and Laureate Diploma from the Regenerative Medicine Secretariat for " ..your discovery of the finite replicative capacity of normal human diploid cells and his contribution to defining the relation of replicative potential to organismal aging." and "..not only has the importance of your discovery been grossly ignored by our scientific-medical culture but also that the significance of your work needs to be duly recognized."

64. 2003 Joe L. Parkin Honorary Memorial Lecturer, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa

65. Invited Speaker at Nobel Conference XL, “The Science of Aging,” Gustavus Adolphus College, Oct.5-6, 2004,St.Peter MN

66. Invited to officially open and dedicate the Henry Wellcome Laboratory for Biogerontology Research at The University of Newcastle upon Tyne, November 10, 2004.

Congressional Testimony

1. Senate Committee on Government Operations, Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman, 1973, Washington, D.C.

2. Subcommittee on Federal, State and Community Services on the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, 95th Congress, February, 1978, Washington, D.C., Representative Claude Pepper, Chairman.

3. Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Representative Natcher, Chairman, May 1983.

4. Subcommittee on Pensions of the Senate Committee on Finance, Senator Chaffee, Chairman, July, 1983.


Memberships in Scientific Societies
American Society for Microbiology (Emeritus)
American Association for the Advancement of Science (Fellow)
Tissue Culture Association (Vice President, 1970) (Emeritus) (Renamed Society for In Vitro Biology)
American Society for Cell Biology (Emeritus)
Gerontological Society of America (President 1982-83)
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (Councilor, 1984-1988, Editorial Board Member, 1988- 1994) (Emeritus)
Association for the Advancement of Aging Research (Fellow)
American Aging Association
American Cancer Society (Emeritus)
International Association of Microbiological Standardization (Chairman, Cell Culture Committee)
International Organization for Mycoplasmology (Retired)
American Society on Aging (Board of Directors)
American Federation for Aging Research (Board of Directors, Former Chairman, Scientific Advisory Board and Member, Executive Committee)
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)
Tissue Culture Association, California Chapter, (President 1970)
Aging Prevention Research Foundation (Scientific Advisory Board)
American Association for Cancer Research
American Association of Pathologists
California Foundation for Biomedical Research
American Longevity Association (Scientific Advisory Board)
European Society for Animal Cell Technology (ESACT) (Retired)